Biogeochemistry of aquatic humic substances in Thoreau's Bog, Concord, Massachusetts

Ecology
By: , and 

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Abstract

Thoreau's Bog is an ombrotrophic floating—mat Sphagnum bog developed in a glacial kettlehole and surrounded by a red maple swamp. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in the porewater of the bog average 36 mg/L and are greatest near the surface, especially during late summer. This distribution suggest that the upper layer of living and dead Sphagnum and moderately humified peat is the major site of dissolved organic material production in the bog. The dissolved organic material consists mainly of aquatic fulvic acid (67%) and hydrophilic acids (20%); these organic acids control the pH (typically 4 or somewhat lower) of the bogwater. The elemental, amino acid, carbohydrate, and carboxylic acid contents of fulvic acid from the bog are similar to those of aquatic fulvic acid from the nearby Shawsheen River, although the phenolic hydroxyl content of fulvic acid from Thoreau's Bog is higher. The hydrophilic acids have greater amino acid, carbohydrate, and carboxylic acid contents than the fulvic acid, consistent with the hypothesis that hydrophilic acids are more labile intermediate compounds in the formation of fulvic acid.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Biogeochemistry of aquatic humic substances in Thoreau's Bog, Concord, Massachusetts
Series title Ecology
DOI 10.2307/1939187
Volume 66
Issue 4
Year Published 1985
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program
Description 14 p.
Last page 1339
Country United States
State Massachusetts
City Concord
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