Crustal-scale thrusting and origin of the Montreal River monocline-A 35-km-thick cross section of the midcontinent rift in northern Michigan and Wisconsin

Tectonics
By: , and 

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Abstract

A structurally simple, 35-km-thick, north facing stratigraphic succession of Late Archean to Middle Proterozoic rocks is exposed near the Montreal River, which forms the border between northern Wisconsin and Michigan. This structure, the Montreal River monocline, is composed of steeply dipping to vertical sedimentary rocks and flood basalts of the Keweenawan Supergroup (Middle Proterozoic) along the south limb of the Midcontinent rift, and disconformably underlying sedimentary rocks of the Marquette Range Supergroup (Early Proterozoic). These rocks lie on an Archean granite-greenstone complex, about 10 km of which is included in the monocline. This remarkable thickness of rocks appears to be essentially structurally intact and lacks evidence of tectonic thickening or repetition.

Tilting to form the monocline resulted from southward thrusting on listric faults of crustal dimension. The faults responsible for the monocline are newly recognized components of a well-known regional fault system that partly closed and inverted the Midcontinent rift system. Resetting of biotite ages on the upper plate of the faults indicates that faulting and uplift occurred at about 1060 +/−20 Ma and followed very shortly after extension that formed the Midcontinent rift system.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Crustal-scale thrusting and origin of the Montreal River monocline-A 35-km-thick cross section of the midcontinent rift in northern Michigan and Wisconsin
Series title Tectonics
DOI 10.1029/93TC00204
Volume 12
Issue 3
Year Published 1993
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Description 17 p.
First page 728
Last page 744