Growth faulting and salt diapirism; their relationship and control in the Carolina Trough, eastern North America

By: , and 

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Abstract

The Carolina Trough is a long, linear, continental margin basin off eastern North America. Salt domes along the trough's seaward side show evidence of active diapirism and a normal growth fault along its landward side has been continually active at least since the end of the Jurassic. This steep fault extends to a strong reflection event at about 11 km depth that may represent the top of a salt layer. We infer that faulting is caused by seaward flow of salt from the deep part of the trough into domes, thereby removing support for the overlying block of sedimentary rock. Diapirs off eastern North America seem to be concentrated in the Carolina Trough and Scotian Basin, where basement seems to be thinner than in other basins off eastern North America, south of Newfo ndland. Thinner basement, probably due to greater stretching during rifing, may have resulted in earlier subsidence below sea level, a longer life for the salt evaporating pans in these basins, and thus a thicker salt layer, which would be more conducive to diapirism.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Growth faulting and salt diapirism; their relationship and control in the Carolina Trough, eastern North America
Year Published 1982
Language English
Publisher Datapages, Inc.
Description 26 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title M 34: Studies in continental margin geology
First page 21
Last page 46