The relative contribution of waves, tides, and nontidal residuals to extreme total water levels on U.S. West Coast sandy beaches

Geophysical Research Letters
By: , and 

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Abstract

To better understand how individual processes combine to cause flooding and erosion events, we investigate the relative contribution of tides, waves, and nontidal residuals to extreme total water levels (TWLs) at the shoreline of U.S. West Coast sandy beaches. Extreme TWLs, defined as the observed annual maximum event and the simulated 100 year return level event, peak in Washington, and are on average larger in Washington and Oregon than in California. The relative contribution of wave-induced and still water levels (SWL) to the 100 year TWL event is similar to that of the annual maximum event; however, the contribution of storm surge to the SWL doubles across events. Understanding the regional variability of TWLs will lead to a better understanding of how sea level rise, changes in storminess, and possible changes in the frequency of major El Niños may impact future coastal flooding and erosion along the U.S. West Coast and elsewhere.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title The relative contribution of waves, tides, and nontidal residuals to extreme total water levels on U.S. West Coast sandy beaches
Series title Geophysical Research Letters
DOI 10.1002/2016GL071020
Volume 44
Issue 4
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher AGU
Contributing office(s) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center
Description 9 p.
First page 1839
Last page 1847
Country United States
State California, Oregon, Washington