Monitoring landscape-level distribution and migration Phenology of Raptors using a volunteer camera-trap network

Wildlife Society Bulletin
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

Conservation of animal migratory movements is among the most important issues in wildlife management. To address this need for landscape-scale monitoring of raptor populations, we developed a novel, baited photographic observation network termed the “Appalachian Eagle Monitoring Program” (AEMP). During winter months of 2008–2012, we partnered with professional and citizen scientists in 11 states in the United States to collect approximately 2.5 million images. To our knowledge, this represents the largest such camera-trap effort to date. Analyses of data collected in 2011 and 2012 revealed complex, often species-specific, spatial and temporal patterns in winter raptor movement behavior as well as spatial and temporal resource partitioning between raptor species. Although programmatic advances in data analysis and involvement are needed, the continued growth of the program has the potential to provide a long-term, cost-effective, range-wide monitoring tool for avian and terrestrial scavengers during the winter season. Perhaps most importantly, by relying heavily on citizen scientists, AEMP has the potential to improve long-term interest and support for raptor conservation and serve as a model for raptor conservation programs in other portions of the world.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Monitoring landscape-level distribution and migration Phenology of Raptors using a volunteer camera-trap network
Series title Wildlife Society Bulletin
DOI 10.1002/wsb.571
Volume 39
Issue 3
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Coop Res Unit Leetown
Description 11 p.
First page 553
Last page 563