Spatially explicit models of full-season productivity and implications for landscape management of Golden-winged Warblers in the western Great Lakes Region: Chapter 9

Studies in Avian Biology - 9
By: , and 

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Abstract

The relationship between landscape structure and composition and full-season productivity (FSP) is poorly understood for most birds. For species of high conservation concern, insight into how productivity is related to landscape structure and composition can be used to develop more effective conservation strategies that increase recruitment. We monitored nest productivity and fledgling survival of Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera), a species of high conservation concern, in managed forest landscapes at two sites in northern Minnesota, and one site in southeastern Manitoba, Canada from 2010 to 2012. We used logistic exposure models to identify the influence of landscape structure and composition on nest productivity and fledgling survival. We used the models to predict spatially explicit, FSP across our study sites to identify areas of low relative productivity that could be targeted for management. We then used our models of spatially explicit, FSP to simulate the impact of potential management actions on our study sites with the goal of increasing total population productivity. Unlike previous studies that suggested wetland cover types provide higher quality breeding habitat for Golden-winged Warblers, our models predicted 14% greater productivity in upland cover types. Simulated succession of a 9-ha grassland patch to a shrubby upland suitable for nesting increased the total number of fledglings produced by that patch and adjacent upland shrublands by 30%, despite decreasing individual productivity by 13%. Further simulated succession of the same patch described above into deciduous forest reduced the total number of fledglings produced to independence on a landscape by 18% because of a decrease in the area available for nesting. Simulated reduction in the cumulative length of shrubby edge within a 50-m radius of any location in our landscapes from 0.6 to 0.3 km increased FSP by 5%. Our models demonstrated that the effects of any single management action depended on the context of the surrounding landscape. We conclude that spatially explicit, FSP models that incorporate data from both the nesting and postfledging periods are useful for informing breeding habitat management plans for Golden-winged Warblers and that similar models can benefit management planning for
many other species of conservation concern.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Spatially explicit models of full-season productivity and implications for landscape management of Golden-winged Warblers in the western Great Lakes Region: Chapter 9
Series title Studies in Avian Biology
Chapter 9
ISBN 978-1-4822-4068-9
Volume 49
Year Published 2016
Language English
Publisher CRC Press
Publisher location Boca Raton, FL
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Leetown
Description 20 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Golden-winged Warbler ecology, conservation, and habitat management (Studies in Avian Biology, volume 49)
First page 141
Last page 160