Tree-ring dated landslide movements and seismic events in southwestern Montana, USA

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Abstract

Because many tree species can live for several centuries or longer (Brown 1996), tree-ring analysis can be a valuable tool to date geomorphic events such as landslides, earthquakes, and avalanches in regions lacking long historical records. Typically, a catastrophic landslide will destroy all trees on the landslide, but trees on slower moving landslides may survive. For example, the Slumgullion earthflow, in southwestern Colorado, moves 0.5–5.5 m annually, yet is covered by aspen (Populus tremuloides) and conifers (Baum and Fleming 1996). Trees that survive such movements undoubtedly suffer damage, such as topping, tilting, impact, or root breakage. This damage is commonly recorded in the tree-ring record and analysis of this record can be used to reconstruct past landslide activity.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Tree-ring dated landslide movements and seismic events in southwestern Montana, USA
ISBN 978-90-481-8735-5
DOI 10.1007/978-90-481-8736-2_39
Volume 41
Year Published 2010
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center
Description 16 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Tree rings and natural hazards; Volume 41 of the series Advances in global change research
First page 421
Last page 436