Recent trends in the west Greenland salmon fishery, and implications for Thick-billed Murres

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Abstract

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a high net-mortality of seabirds, particularly Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia), was associated with the west Greenland salmon fishery. Since 1972, the domestic fishery has been controlled by quotas and fishery opening dates and non-Greenlandic offshore drift-net fishery was phased out in 1975. These restrictions probably resulted in a substantial decrease in murre net-mortality. However, the Greenlandic fishery has changed considerably since 1972 when seabird bycatch was last examined in detail. Fishing vessels now use monofilament nylon nets almost exclusively; fishing effort has redistributed closer to murre breeding colonies and intensive drift-netting occurs offshore on the continental shelf. These factors, combined with a change in 1981 to a later fishing season have probably resulted in a renewal of significant murre net-morality at west Greenland.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title Recent trends in the west Greenland salmon fishery, and implications for Thick-billed Murres
ISBN 0-662-13311-0
Year Published 1982
Language English
Publisher Pacific Seabird Group
Publisher location Little River, CA
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center
Description 3 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Conference publication
Larger Work Title Marine birds: Their feeding ecology and commercial fisheries relationships
First page 208
Last page 210
Conference Title Special Symposium at the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Pacific Seabird Group
Conference Location Seattle, WA
Conference Date January 6-8, 1982
Country Greenland