Stable isotopes in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems: Interactions between fluids, minerals, and organisms

By: , and 
Edited by: S.D. HumphriesRobert A. ZierenbergLauren S. Mullineaux, and Richard E. Thomson

Links

Abstract

Studies of abundance variations of light stable isotopes in nature have had a tremendous impact on all aspects of geochemistry since the development, in 1947, of a gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer capable of measuring small variations in stable isotope ratios (Nice, 1947]. Stable isotope geochemistry is now a mature field, as witnessed by the proliferation of commercially available mass spectrometers installed at virtually every major academic, government, and private-sector research geochemistry laboratory. A recent search of a literature database revealed over 3,000 articles that utilized stable isotope geochemistry over the last 20 years. Nonetheless, many exciting new technical developments are leading to exciting new discoveries and applications. In particular, micro-analytical techniques involving new generations of laser- and ion-microprobes are revolutionizing the types of analyses that can be done on spot sizes as small as a few tens of micrometers [Shanks and Criss, 1989]. New generations of conventional gas source and thermal ionization mass spectrometers, with high levels of automation and increased sensitivity and precision, are allowing analyses of large numbers of samples, like those needed for stable isotope stratigraphy in marine sediments, and are enabling the development and application of new isotopic systems.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Stable isotopes in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems: Interactions between fluids, minerals, and organisms
DOI 10.1029/GM091p0194
Year Published 1995
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Contributing office(s) National Research Program - Eastern Branch
Description 28 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Seafloor hydrothermal systems: Physical, chemical, biological, and geological interactions
First page 194
Last page 221