Terranes and suture zones in east central Alaska

Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
By: , and 

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Abstract

East central Alaska, with its 17 terranes, forms a part of the mosaic of allochthonous terranes that join the North American and Siberian plates. These terranes range from continental and continental margin, such as the Tatonduk with its thick well-bedded succession of marine shelf rocks, to seamount, arc, and ocean floor terranes. The Yukon crystalline terrane, the largest described here, is a composite of at least four subterranes juxtaposed across the Tintina fault with the Tatonduk terrane, a northwestern extension of the North American plate in Alaska. Inboard of the Yukon crystalline terrane are packets of closely appressed microterranes separated from the Tatonduk and other terranes belonging to North America by major suture zones. These microterranes lie between North America and the mosaic of accretionary terranes that form the more southerly part of Alaska. The most obviously allochthonous microterranes within the suture zones are the Woodchopper Canyon, an Early Devonian basaltic seamount, and the White Mountains, an Ordovician volcanic arc terrane capped by Silurian and Devonian carbonate bank deposits. The nearest counterpart of these terranes is the Alexander terrane in southeastern Alaska. The Tintina fault of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age, like the Denali fault, primarily follows old suture zones that separate terranes. Strike slip faulting developed after collision in places where further convergence was oblique to the terrane margins. Where terranes met head-on, their leading edges lie along a multiple set of high-angle faults that outline microterranes in accretion zones.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Terranes and suture zones in east central Alaska
Series title Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
DOI 10.1029/JB087iB05p03718
Volume 87
Issue B5
Year Published 1982
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Description 13 p.
First page 3718
Last page 3730
Country United States
State Alaska