Linkages between climate, growth, competition at sea and production of sockeye salmon populations in Bristol Bay, 1955-2000

By:  and 
Edited by: Sarah BehrHelen Wiggins, and Alison York

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Abstract

Bristol Bay, Alaska, supports one of the largest and most valuable salmon fisheries in the world. Salmon abundance in Bristol Bay and other northern areas more than doubled after the 1976–77 marine climate shift. However, in 1997–98, a major El Niño event led to unusual oceanographic conditions and Bristol Bay sockeye salmon production was unexpectedly low. Nevertheless, the effect of climate on biological mechanisms leading to greater salmon survival and production are poorly understood. In order to test several hypotheses linking climate to salmon growth, interspecific and intraspecific competition, and salmon production, we measured annual marine and freshwater scale growth of Bristol Bay sockeye salmon, 1955 to 2000.

Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title Linkages between climate, growth, competition at sea and production of sockeye salmon populations in Bristol Bay, 1955-2000
Year Published 2005
Language English
Publisher Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center
Description 1 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Conference publication
Larger Work Title Proceedings of the open science meeting study of environmental Arctic change (SEARCH)
First page 198
Last page 198
Conference Title Open Science Meeting: Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH)
Conference Location Seattle, WA
Conference Date October 27-30, 2003
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial Bristol Bay