Distribution and tsunamigenic potential of submarine landslides in the Gulf of Mexico

By: , and 

Links

Abstract

The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is a geologically diverse ocean basin that includes three distinct geologic provinces: a carbonate province, a salt province, and canyon to deep-sea fan province, all of which contain evidence of submarine mass movements. The threat of submarine landslides in the GOM as a generator of near-field damaging tsunamis has not been widely addressed. Submarine landslides in the GOM are considered a potential tsunami hazard because: (1) some dated landslides in the GOM have post-glacial ages and (2) recent seismicity recorded within the GOM. We present a brief review of the distribution and style of submarine landslides that have occurred in the GOM during the Quaternary, followed by preliminary hydrodynamic modeling results of tsunami generation from the East Breaks landslide off Corpus Christie, TX.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Distribution and tsunamigenic potential of submarine landslides in the Gulf of Mexico
DOI 10.1007/978-90-481-3071-9_60
Volume 28
Year Published 2010
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center
Description 10 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Submarine mass movements and their consequences. Advances in natural and technological hazards research, vol 28
First page 745
Last page 754