Comparison of oyster populations, shoreline protection service, and site characteristics at seven created fringing reefs in Louisiana: Key parameters and responses to consider

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Abstract

Coastal erosion threatens many low-lying areas around the globe. Rising sea levels from climate change are expected to increase coastal erosion and exacerbate flooding and storm surges. This is particularly true in low-lying coastal Louisiana, which developed as the Mississippi River changed course (delta switching) over the past 7000 years. Periods of land loss and gain resulted in an intricate coastal environment composed of shallow water areas with wetlands, swamps, barrier islands, and ridges (Day et al. 2007). This complex habitat sustains high economic and biological productivity, supporting the largest commercial fishery in the lower 48 states, providing habitat for important species of fish and wildlife, mitigating storm surge, and delivering protection for oil and gas production facilities, including five of the nation’s largest ports. Because of past and ongoing geological and physical processes, such as subsidence, sea level rise, tropical cyclonic activity, and direct human activities (Barras 2009; Chmura et al. 1992; Georgiou et al. 2005), coastal Louisiana is estimated to have lost an area almost the size of Delaware (4877 km2) between 1932 and 2010, with recent analyses indicating losses averaging 42.9 km2/year (Couvillion et al. 2011).

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Comparison of oyster populations, shoreline protection service, and site characteristics at seven created fringing reefs in Louisiana: Key parameters and responses to consider
ISBN 9781498740029
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher CRC Research Press
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Atlanta
Description 20 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Living shorelines: The science and management of nature-based coastal protection