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Species distribution models for a migratory bird based on citizen science and satellite tracking data

Global Ecology and Conservation

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https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2017.08.001

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Abstract

Species distribution models can provide critical baseline distribution information for the conservation of poorly understood species. Here, we compared the performance of band-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata) species distribution models created using Maxent and derived from two separate presence-only occurrence data sources in New Mexico: 1) satellite tracked birds and 2) observations reported in eBird basic data set. Both models had good accuracy (test AUC > 0.8 and True Skill Statistic > 0.4), and high overlap between suitability scores (I statistic 0.786) and suitable habitat patches (relative rank 0.639). Our results suggest that, at the state-wide level, eBird occurrence data can effectively model similar species distributions as satellite tracking data. Climate change models for the band-tailed pigeon predict a 35% loss in area of suitable climate by 2070 if CO2 emissions drop to 1990 levels by 2100, and a 45% loss by 2070 if we continue current CO2 emission levels through the end of the century. These numbers may be conservative given the predicted increase in drought, wildfire, and forest pest impacts to the coniferous forests the species inhabits in New Mexico. The northern portion of the species’ range in New Mexico is predicted to be the most viable through time.

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Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Species distribution models for a migratory bird based on citizen science and satellite tracking data
Series title:
Global Ecology and Conservation
DOI:
10.1016/j.gecco.2017.08.001
Volume:
11
Year Published:
2017
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Contributing office(s):
Coop Res Unit Seattle
Description:
14 p.
First page:
298
Last page:
311
Country:
United States
State:
New Mexico