Golden Eagle predation of an adult turkey vulture

Bulletin of the Texas Ornithological Society
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Abstract

The Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is a large, apex predator that occurs at low densities, has a long life span, experiences delayed maturity, has low reproductive rates, and has no natural predators (Watson 1997, Kochert et al. 2002). Golden Eagles are sensitive to anthropogenic driven landscape changes in land cover and land use (Hunt 2002, Kochert and Steenhof 2002). Landscape level alterations, such as encroachment of woody vegetation in eagle foraging areas, may result in decreased abundance of suitable prey or interfere with the eagle’s ability to see or capture prey. Currently, there is substantial concern for Golden Eagle conservation due to widespread anthropogenic changes to landscapes across much of the species distribution (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2013). In particular, the rapid expansion of wind energy development has led to heightened concerns for Golden Eagle conservation, as the species is susceptible to mortality through collision with turbines (Hunt 2002, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2013). This has resulted in a recent increase in research to develop a better understanding of the species’ ecology. 

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Golden Eagle predation of an adult turkey vulture
Series title Bulletin of the Texas Ornithological Society
Volume 48
Issue 1-2
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher Texas Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Atlanta
Description 3 p.
First page 53
Last page 55