Postembryonic growth and development of Hyalella azteca in laboratory cultures and contaminated sediments

Chemosphere
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Abstract

The environmental, biological, and ecological requirements of but a few species used in testing sediments are known and well understood. The present investigation was designed to provide fundamental information on the postembryonic growth and development of Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda) that can be used as sublethal indicators of contaminated sediments, and the influence growth characteristics may have on interpretation of sediment toxicity test results. The biological endpoints for measuring H. azteca growth and development included sexual maturation, molt frequency, intermolt duration, body length, antennal segment addition, and the relation between total body length and antennal segment addition. To use growth and development of H. azteca as sublethal indicators of contaminated sediments, tests of up to 28 days duration should begin with immature amphipods (less than two weeks old) that will begin the adult stage at the end of the test. Sexual maturation begins at the sixth instar (about 24 days at 20°C) and can be used as a sublethal indicator of development effects. The presence of an enlarged propodus is a reliable indicator of sexual maturation in H. azteca which easily distinguishes the immature (first five instars) from the juvenile (instars 6 and 7) stage.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Postembryonic growth and development of Hyalella azteca in laboratory cultures and contaminated sediments
Series title Chemosphere
DOI 10.1016/0045-6535(95)00171-4
Volume 31
Issue 4
Year Published 1995
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Columbia Environmental Research Center
Description 12 p.
First page 3129
Last page 3140
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