Natural history, field ecology, conservation biology and wildlife management: Time to connect the dots

Herpetological Conservation and Biology
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Abstract

Natural history and field ecology are essential building blocks for successful conservation and management of herpetofauna. Thus, natural history and field ecology merit major infusions of funding and increased recognition of their importance in science and management. Others have stated matters well: (1) Academic training in natural history should receive high priority; (2) we need to integrate our work across disciplines (from molecules to communities), and use all of our knowledge toward common goals; (3) natural history is not dead but today is a flourishing enterprise; and (4) mutual respect and collaboration between disciplines best serve our own mental health as well as the future of natural history. We need to merge the best natural history, field ecological data, and biological questions with the latest advances in other fields of inquiry if we are to advance science and solve key environmental issues. It takes a scientific community and many concerned parties to save a species, let alone an ecosystem. We must connect these dots to see the big picture.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Natural history, field ecology, conservation biology and wildlife management: Time to connect the dots
Series title Herpetological Conservation and Biology
Volume 1
Issue 1
Year Published 2006
Language English
Publisher Herpetological Conservation and Biology
Contributing office(s) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description 6 p.
First page 56
Last page 61