Plume-scale testing of a simplified method for detecting tritium contamination in plants and soil

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Abstract

Cost-effective methods are needed to detect contamination near radioactive-waste and other contaminated sites. Such methods should be capable of providing an early warning of contaminant releases and should be accurate and robust enough for assessing the long-term performance of waste-isolation facilities and remediation measures. Recently, a simplified method for detecting tritium contamination in plants and soil was developed (1). The method includes solar distillation of plant water from foliage, followed by filtration and adsorption of scintillation-interfering constituents on a graphite-based solid-phase-extraction column prior to direct-scintillation counting. The objectives of the in-progress study described here are to (i) test the simplified contamination-detection method for collection and analysis of plume-scale tritium data and (ii) gain insight into tritium migration pathways and processes.

Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title Plume-scale testing of a simplified method for detecting tritium contamination in plants and soil
Chapter 4.5
Year Published 2004
Language English
Publisher Center for Integrated Sensor Technology and Environmental Monitoring Systems
Contributing office(s) Nevada Water Science Center
Description 4 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Conference publication
Larger Work Title Proceedings, Workshop on long-term performance monitoring of metals and radionuclides in the subsurface
Conference Title Joint workshop on long-term monitoring of metals and radionuclides in the subsurface: Strategies, tools and case studies
Conference Location Reston, VA
Conference Date April 21-22, 2004
Country United States
State Nevada
City Beatty
Other Geospatial Amargosa Desert Research Site