Comment on linking the sex difference in PCB concentrations of fish to release of eggs at spawning: Time to jettison the dogma

Oceanography & Fisheries
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Abstract

For the past 20 years or so, a commonly used explanation in the scientific literature for higher polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in male fish than in female fish has been that females lose a high proportion of their PCB body burden by releasing eggs at spawning time, and therefore the females undergo a substantial decrease in their PCB concentration immediately after spawning due to shedding of their eggs [1]. Indeed, this explanation can be viewed as the conventional wisdom used by toxicologists to account for differences in PCB concentrations between the sexes of fish. On the surface, this explanation seems plausible. PCBs are lipid soluble, and eggs are thought to be relatively high in lipid concentration. If a sufficiently high proportion of the PCB body burden within a female fish is transferred to the eggs, then the release of eggs at spawning would be expected to result in a dramatic decrease in the PCB concentration of the female.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Comment on linking the sex difference in PCB concentrations of fish to release of eggs at spawning: Time to jettison the dogma
Series title Oceanography & Fisheries
DOI 10.19080/OFOAJ.2017.05.555661
Volume 5
Issue 3
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher Juniper Publishers
Contributing office(s) Great Lakes Science Center
Description Article 555661; 2 p.