The application of acoustic Doppler current profilers to measure the timing and patterns of coral larval dispersal

Coral Reefs
By: , and 

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Abstract

An experiment was conducted along the reefs off west Maui, Hawaii, during the summer of 2003 to monitor the spawning of the reef-building coral Montipora capitata and to determine the role of ocean currents in dispersing the larvae from the natal reef. Instruments documented the environmental forcing during the coral spawning season; drifters were deployed on three successive nights following direct observations of coral spawning. Both the timing and relative magnitude of the coral spawning were identifiable in acoustic backscatter data and correlated to plankton tow data. Each drifter track showed that the surface water containing coral eggs and planula larvae were transported rapidly offshore and not locally retained. Wind and current patterns during the previous year and during subsequent coral spawning events later in the summer were similar to those observed during the drifter releases. This suggests that the trajectories observed during the focused experiment are representative of the general pattern of larval dispersal off west Maui. These findings demonstrate the application of acoustic profilers for remotely imaging coral spawning and predicting their initial dispersal patterns.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title The application of acoustic Doppler current profilers to measure the timing and patterns of coral larval dispersal
Series title Coral Reefs
DOI 10.1007/s00338-006-0121-x
Volume 25
Issue 3
Year Published 2006
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center
Description 13 p.
First page 369
Last page 381
Country United States
State Hawaii
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