Remagnetization of the Coast Range Ophiolite and Lower Part of the Great Valley Sequence in Northern California and Southwest Oregon

Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
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Abstract

Overprinted magnetizations have been found at four localities in the Middle Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite and the overlying Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Great Valley sequence in northern California and at one locality in the partially correlative Lower Cretaceous Days Creek Formation in southwest Oregon. At Del Puerto Canyon, on the east side of the Diablo Range, a pilot study of the upper Jurassic Lotta Creek Formation gives in situ paleomagnetic directions grouped around the present geomagnetic field, suggesting magnetic overprinting long after deposition and folding. We suggest that the loss of original magnetization could be the result of long burial at about 7 km depth, followed by Late Tertiary uplift; the possibility of chemical remagnetization, however, can not be excluded. Paleomagnetic data from sandstones from the Lower Cretaceous Great Valley sequence in the Wilbur Springs area suggest Cenozoic remagnetization that could be related to Pliocene and Pleistocene volcanic and hydrothermal activity in the area. The results from calcareous concretions in the Wilbur Springs area, from 21 sites from basalts and overlying sedimentary rocks of the Great Valley sequence at Stonyford, and from several sites in various rock types in the Coast Range ophiolite and Great Valley sequence near Paskenta suggest unblocking of magnetization during the long period of burial at depth of 7 km or more and remagnetization during tectonic uplift in the Late Cretaceous or Tertiary. Chemical remagnetization, however, can not be excluded. The paleomagnetic data from six sites in Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Days Creek Formation in southwest Oregon, which overlies a dismembered ophiolite, fail the fold test. In situ paleomagnetic directions group near the expected Tertiary field directions. These sedimentary rocks may have been remagnetized during a major Eocene tectonic event known to have occurred in this region. The paleomagnetic results confirm that the Coast Range ophiolite and the seemingly little-deformed Great Valley sequence in northern California, as well as correlative rocks in southwest Oregon have had a complex tectonic history. Once the nature and timing of these events are better understood, the timing of remagnetization may be further constrained, which, in turn, could give further insight into the nature of the tectonic events

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Remagnetization of the Coast Range Ophiolite and Lower Part of the Great Valley Sequence in Northern California and Southwest Oregon
Series title Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
DOI 10.1029/JB092iB05p03487
Volume 92
Issue B5
Year Published 1987
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Contributing office(s) Geology, Minerals, Energy, and Geophysics Science Center
Description 13 p.
First page 3487
Last page 3499
Country United States
State California, Oregon