Magma flux at Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from a joint inversion of continuous GPS, campaign GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar

Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

Volcano deformation is usually measured using satellite geodetic techniques including interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), campaign GPS, and continuous GPS. Differences in the spatial and temporal sampling of each system mean that most appropriate inversion scheme to determine the source parameters from each data set is different. Most studies either compare results from independent inversions or subsample the data sets to the lowest common factor. It is unclear whether differences in the solution reflect differences in source behavior, differences in measurement bias, or differences in inversion technique. Here we develop a single inversion procedure that captures the benefits of each system, especially the daily sampling of continuous GPS and the high spatial resolution of InSAR. Okmok Volcano, Alaska, is an ideal target for such a test because a long series (<15 years) of InSAR and continuous GPS measurement exists and the source is almost continuously active and in a stable location.

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Magma flux at Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from a joint inversion of continuous GPS, campaign GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar
Series title Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
Subseries Geodesy and Gravity/Techonophysics
DOI 10.1029/2010JB007577
Volume 115
Issue B12
Year Published 2010
Language English
Publisher AGU
Contributing office(s) Cascades Volcano Observatory
Description B12401; 11 p.
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial Okmok Volcano