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Phenology of hatching, emergence, and end-of-season body size in young-of-year Coho Salmon in thermally contrasting streams draining the Copper River Delta, Alaska

Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

By:
https://doi.org/10.1139/cjfas-2018-0003

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Abstract

Phenology can be linked to individual fitness, particularly in strongly seasonal environments where the timing of events have important consequences for growth, condition, and survival. We studied the phenology of Coho Salmon hatching and emergence in streams with contrasting thermal variability, but in close geographic proximity. Following emergence, we tracked body sizes of cohorts of young-of-year fish until the end of the growing season. Hatch and emergence timing occurred at the same time among streams with marked variability in thermal regimes. We demonstrate that this can be explained in part by the thermal units accumulated during embryo development. At the end of the first growing season there were some differences in body size, however overall fish size among streams were similar despite strong differences in thermal regimes. Collectively these results provide novel insights into the interactions between environmental variability and the early life-history stages of Coho Salmon furthering our understanding of the consequences of phenology on growth and survival for individuals within the critical first summer of life.

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Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Phenology of hatching, emergence, and end-of-season body size in young-of-year Coho Salmon in thermally contrasting streams draining the Copper River Delta, Alaska
Series title:
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
DOI:
10.1139/cjfas-2018-0003
Edition:
Online First
Year Published:
2018
Language:
English
Publisher:
Canadian Science Publishing
Contributing office(s):
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Country:
United States
State:
Alaska
Other Geospatial:
Copper River Delta