Using transport model interpretations of tracer tests to study microbial processes in groundwater

By:  and 

Links

Abstract

It has long been known that microorganisms affect the geochemistry of groundwater. But despite this recognition, little detailed information is available regarding the rates and the factors controlling microbial processes in groundwater. Part of the reason stems from the relatively inaccessible nature of most groundwater and the difficulties encountered in obtaining representative samples of groundwater and subsurface sediments. At the same time, most groundwater systems are nutrient poor or oligotrophic environments in which the resident microorganisms are severely stressed and often nearly inactive. These populations are functioning so slowly that many types of activity measurements designed to assess microbial processes in more productive environments are ineffective for groundwater. However, because groundwater is by far the largest reservoir of freshwater in the world (Freeze and Cherry 1979), our lack of knowledge about groundwater microorganisms and their processes represents a significant void in the study of microbial ecology and in our ability to predict the outcome when these reserves are compromised by contamination.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Using transport model interpretations of tracer tests to study microbial processes in groundwater
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4615-4078-6_5
Year Published 1998
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, National Research Program - Central Branch
Description 30 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Mathematical modeling in microbial ecology
First page 94
Last page 123
Google Analytic Metrics Metrics page