Spatial, seasonal and diel distribution of fishes in a California reservoir dominated by native fishes

Fisheries Research
By: , and 

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Abstract

During 21 months of sampling with various techniques, we captured 24 species of fish in Britton Reservoir. Nine species comprised over 96% of the number of fish captured and approximately 88% of the biomass. Five native non-game species accounted for over 77% of the catches.

The native non-game fishes have maintained large populations in the reservoir despite continued introductions of non-native species. Two sources of non-native species exist. The first is the introduction of exotic species directly into the reservoir during fish-stocking programs. The second is the continuous movement of non-native fishes into the reservoir from large populations which reside in a major tributary of the reservoir. Factors responsible for the large number of native fishes are: management of the reservoir for hydroelectric generation; temperature regime; reservoir morphology.

The fish community structure is stratified along two axes: upper basin/lower basin and inshore/offshore. Most of the 24 species were found inshore: 14 species were found offshore. Four of the native non-game fishes were most abundant in the upper basin: three introduced non-native fishes were most abundant in the lower basin of the reservoir. The offshore community was dynamic on a daily and seasonal basis.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Spatial, seasonal and diel distribution of fishes in a California reservoir dominated by native fishes
Series title Fisheries Research
DOI 10.1016/0165-7836(89)90005-2
Volume 7
Issue 1-2
Year Published 1989
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) California Water Science Center
Description 23 p.
First page 31
Last page 53
Country United States
State California
Other Geospatial Britton Reservoir