Spatial distribution of halogen oxides in the plume of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands

Geophysical Research Letters
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Abstract

Halogens are emitted from volcanoes primarily as hydrogen halides (HCl, HF, HBr, and HI). Upon mixing with the atmosphere, chlorine and bromine species are partially converted to the halogen oxides OClO and BrO. Here we report on the spatial distribution of BrO and OClO in the gas plume emitted from Mount Pagan volcano, Northern Mariana Islands. We found enhanced BrO/SO2 ratios near the plume edges and a lack of OClO in the plume's core. Our results highlight the importance of in‐mixing of atmospheric oxidants for halogen oxide formation. They indicate that OClO can only be formed after most bromide dissolved in plume aerosols has been released to the gas phase. We conclude that Mount Pagan's gas emissions originated from a shallow magma body and were transported to the surface along dry degassing pathways and that the volcano's halogen emissions likely had significant impact on the oxidation capacity of the downwind atmosphere.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Spatial distribution of halogen oxides in the plume of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands
Series title Geophysical Research Letters
DOI 10.1029/2018GL079245
Edition Online First
Year Published 2018
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Contributing office(s) Volcano Science Center
Other Geospatial Mariana Islands, Mount Pagan Volcano