Chapter 2: Climate, disturbance, and vulnerability to vegetation change in the Northwest Forest Plan Area

General Technical Report PNW-GTR-966
By: , and 

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Abstract

Climate change is expected to alter the composition, structure, and function of forested ecosystems in the United States (Vose et al. 2012). Increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide [CO2]) and temperature, as well as altered precipitation and disturbance regimes (e.g., fire, insects, pathogens, and windstorms), are expected to have profound effects on biodiversity, socioeconomics, and the delivery of ecosystem services within the Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP, or Plan) area over the next century (Dale et al. 2001, Franklin et al. 1991). The ecological interactions and diversity of biophysical settings in the region are complex. The effects of climate change on ecological processes will occur through a variety of mechanisms at a range of spatial scales and levels of biological organization, ranging from the physiological responses of individual plants to the composition and structure of stands and landscapes (Peterson et al. 2014a). Understanding and incorporating how climate change projections and the potential ecological effects and uncertainties differ within the region (e.g., Deser et al. 2012) is essential for developing adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Federal Government Series
Title Chapter 2: Climate, disturbance, and vulnerability to vegetation change in the Northwest Forest Plan Area
Series title General Technical Report
Series number PNW-GTR-966
Year Published 2018
Language English
Publisher U.S. Forest Service
Contributing office(s) Alaska Climate Science Center
Description 65 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype Federal Government Series
Larger Work Title Synthesis of science to inform land management within the Northwest Forest Plan area
First page 29
Last page 93
Country United States