Evaluating riparian vegetation change in canyon-bound reaches of the Colorado River using spatially extensive matched photo sets

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Abstract

Much of what we know about the functional ecology of aquatic and riparian ecosystems comes from work on regulated rivers (Johnson et al. 2012). What little we know about unregulated conditions on many of our larger rivers is often inferred from recollections of individuals, personal diaries, notes, maps, and collections from early scientific surveys (Webb et al. 2007) and from repeat photography (Turner and Karpiscak 1980; Webb 1996). Later surveys often included photographs typically taken at specific and relatively few locations. Because rivers and their related riparian ecosystems vary in both longitudinal and lateral dimensions, such records provide relatively general and incomplete information about historical resource conditions, especially at large spatial scales and over long spans of time.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Evaluating riparian vegetation change in canyon-bound reaches of the Colorado River using spatially extensive matched photo sets
DOI 10.2737/RMRS-GTR-377-CHAP9
Year Published 2018
Language English
Publisher U.S. Forest Service
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 26 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype Federal Government Series
Larger Work Title Riparian research and management: Past, present, future: Volume 1 (General Technical Report RMRS-GTR-377)
First page 148
Last page 173
Country United States
State Arizona, Colorado
Other Geospatial Colorado River