Effectiveness of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) suppression in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho: 2006–2016

Hydrobiologia
By: , and 

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Abstract

The nonnative lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush Walbaum, 1792) population in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho increased exponentially during 1999–2006. This led to an unsustainable level of predation mortality on kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum, 1792), increased the conservation threat to native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus Suckley, 1859), and jeopardized the popular recreational fishery for kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykissWalbaum, 1792). In response, lake trout were suppressed since 2006 using incentivized angling, gill netting, and trap netting. From 2006 through 2016, 193,982 lake trout were removed (50% by gill netting; 44% by angling; 6% by trap netting). During this period, age-8 + (adult) lake trout abundance declined by 64%, age-3 (recruit) abundance declined by 56%, and mean total annual mortality (A) was 31.1%. Lake trout did not show evidence of a density-dependent response. Kokanee did not collapse and rebounded to abundances not observed since before lake trout expansion. Bull trout abundance declined during suppression, but the population was sustained. Lake trout suppression allowed a harvest fishery for kokanee and trophy fishery for rainbow trout to be restored. We conclude that suppression can be an effective management action for mitigating effects of nonnative lake trout in a large, deep lake.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Effectiveness of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) suppression in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho: 2006–2016
Series title Hydrobiologia
DOI 10.1007/s10750-019-3913-z
Edition Online First
Year Published 2019
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Great Lakes Science Center