Turbidity current observations in a large reservoir following a major wildfire

Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
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Abstract

Turbidity currents are generated when denser river water plunges and flows along the bottom of a lake, reservoir, or ocean. The plunging and downstream movement are driven by density differences due to temperature and/or suspended sediment, and currents have been observed to move slowly over long distances. This study presents observations of multiple turbidity currents in a large reservoir in California, United States, during runoff events following a major wildfire in the upstream watershed. Several aspects of the currents are documented and discussed, including the conditions leading to plunging, the vertical and longitudinal structure of turbidity within the currents, the velocity of the currents, and the development of a muddy lake upstream from an old submerged dam in the reservoir.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Turbidity current observations in a large reservoir following a major wildfire
Series title Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0001611
Volume 145
Issue 8
Year Published 2019
Language English
Publisher ASCE
Contributing office(s) California Water Science Center
Description 10 p.
Country United States
State California