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Restoring a forest icon: Could returning the American chestnut remodel our wildlife landscape?

The Wildlife Professional
By: , and 

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Abstract

Mother Nature was not making it easy. It was February 18, 2009, and winds were gusting, sleet was falling, and temperatures were hovering around 40° F. Our crew of 9 which consisted of personnel from the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station, the Cherokee National Forest, and The University of Tennessee’s Tree Improvement Program, was attempting to establish the first test planting of American chestnuts (Castanea dentata) bred for resistance to an exotic fungal pathogen, the chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica). With each hole dug and seedlings tamped into the ground, our hope was that we were one step closer to restoring an important wildlife food to eastern hardwood forests.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Restoring a forest icon: Could returning the American chestnut remodel our wildlife landscape?
Series title The Wildlife Professional
Volume 13
Issue 4
Year Published 2019
Language English
Publisher The Wildlife Society
Contributing office(s) Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, Leetown Science Center
Description 5 p.
First page 52
Last page 56
Country United States
State Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia