Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis in wild songbirds: The spread of a new contagious disease in a mobile host population

Emerging Infectious Diseases
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Abstract

A new mycoplasmal conjunctivitis was first reported in wild house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in early 1994. The causative agent was identified as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), a nonzoonotic pathogen of poultry that had not been associated with disease in wild songbirds. Since the initial observations of affected house finches in the mid-Atlantic region, the disease has become widespread and has been reported throughout the eastern United States and Canada. By late 1995, mycoplasmal conjunctivitis had spread to an additional species, the American goldfinch (Carduelis tristis). This new disease exemplifies the rapid spread of a pathogen following introduction into a mobile wildlife population and provides lessons that may apply to emerging human diseases.

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Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis in wild songbirds: The spread of a new contagious disease in a mobile host population
Series title Emerging Infectious Diseases
Volume 3
Issue 1
Year Published 1997
Language English
Publisher CDC
Contributing office(s) National Wildlife Health Center
Description 4 p.
First page 69
Last page 71
Country Canada, United States
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