Drilling the central crater of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: A first look

Eos, Earth and Space Science News
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Abstract

The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure is a well‐preserved example of one of Earth's largest impact craters, and its continental‐shelf setting and relatively shallow burial make it an excellent target for study. Since the discovery of the structure over a decade ago [Edwards et al., 2004; Poag et al., 2004], test drilling by U.S. federal and state agencies has been limited to the structure's annular trough (Figure 1). In May 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilled the first scientific test hole into the central crater of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure in Cape Charies,Virginia (Figure 1). This partially cored test hole, the deepest to date, penetrated postimpact sediments and impact breccias to a total depth of 823 m.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Drilling the central crater of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure: A first look
Series title Eos, Earth and Space Science News
DOI 10.1029/2004EO390001
Volume 85
Issue 39
Year Published 2004
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Description 9 p.
First page 369
Last page 377
Country United States
Other Geospatial Chesapeake Bay
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