Deep long-period earthquakes generated by second boiling beneath Mauna Kea volcano

Science
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Abstract

Deep long-period earthquakes (DLPs) are an enigmatic type of volcanic seismicity that sometimes precedes eruptions but mostly occurs at quiescent volcanoes. These earthquakes are depleted in high-frequency content and typically occur near the base of the crust. We observed a near-periodic, long- lived sequence of more than one million DLPs in the past 19 years beneath the dormant postshield Mauna Kea volcano in Hawai‘i. We argue that this DLP sequence was caused by repeated pressurization of volatiles exsolved through crystallization of cooling magma stalled beneath the crust. This “second boiling” of magma is a well-known process but has not previously been linked to DLP activity. Our observations suggest that, rather than portending eruptions, global DLP activity may more commonly be indicative of stagnant, cooling magma.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Deep long-period earthquakes generated by second boiling beneath Mauna Kea volcano
Series title Science
DOI 10.1126/science.aba4798
Volume 368
Year Published 2020
Language English
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Contributing office(s) Volcano Science Center
Description 5 p.
First page 775
Last page 779
Country United States
State Hawaii
Other Geospatial Mauna Kea volcano
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