Notes on the elasticity of the Lloyd sand on Long Island, New York 

Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
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Abstract

The Lloyd sand is a productive artesian aquifer underlying all of Long Island except the westernmost part. It rests unconformably upon a floor of crystalline rock that slopes toward the southeast at about 100 feet to the mile. Locally the bed‐rock surface has a relief of more than 100 feet. The Lloyd sand consists of white quartz‐sand and gravel, with some layers of clay. It is considered to be part of the Raritan—the basal formation of the Upper Cretaceous series. At Rockaway Park, on the south shore of the Island, the Lloyd is about 200 feet thick and is overlain by 300 feet of clays of Raritan age. The Raritan clays are in turn overlain by about 150 feet of sands, believed to be of Magothy age, and about 315 feet of Pleistocene sediments.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Notes on the elasticity of the Lloyd sand on Long Island, New York 
Series title Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
DOI 10.1029/TR022i003p00783
Edition 3
Issue 22
Year Published 1941
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Description 5 p.
First page 783
Last page 787
Country United States
State New York
Other Geospatial Long Island
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