Biological soil crusts in ecological restoration: Emerging research and perspectives

Restoration Ecology
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

Drylands encompass over 40% of terrestrial ecosystems and face significant anthropogenic degradation causing a loss of ecosystem integrity, services, and deterioration of social‐ecological systems. To combat this degradation, some dryland restoration efforts have focused on the use of biological soil crusts (biocrusts): complex communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens, bryophytes, and other organisms living in association with the top millimeters of soil. Biocrusts are common in many ecosystems and especially drylands. They perform a suite of ecosystem functions: stabilizing soil surfaces to prevent erosion, contributing carbon through photosynthesis, fixing nitrogen, and mediating the hydrological cycle in drylands. Biocrusts have emerged as a potential tool in restoration; developing methods to implement effective biocrust restoration has the potential to return many ecosystem functions and services. Although culture‐based approaches have allowed researchers to learn about the biology, physiology, and cultivation of biocrusts, transferring this knowledge to field implementation has been more challenging. A large amount of research has amassed to improve our understanding of biocrust restoration, leaving us at an opportune time to learn from one another and to join approaches for maximum efficacy. The articles in this special issue improve the state of our current knowledge in biocrust restoration, highlighting efforts to effectively restore biocrusts through a variety of different ecosystems, across scales and utilizing a variety of lab and field methods. This collective work provides a useful resource for the scientific community as well as land managers.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Biological soil crusts in ecological restoration: Emerging research and perspectives
Series title Restoration Ecology
DOI 10.1111/rec.13201
Volume 28
Issue S2
Year Published 2020
Language English
Contributing office(s) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis
Description 6 p.
First page s3
Last page s8
Google Analytic Metrics Metrics page
Additional metadata about this publication, not found in other parts of the page is in this table