Fluctuations in artesian pressure produced by passing railroad‐trains as shown in a well on Long Island, New York

Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
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Abstract

Perhaps one of the chief interests of ground‐water hydrologists is the study of water‐level fluctuations. Since the beginning of the science of hydrology attempts have been made to interpret these phenomena and determine their significance. On the basis of actual observations and “with special reference to Long Island, New York,” Veatch [see 1 of “References” at end of paper] in 1906 considered in some detail several different causes of water‐level fluctuations. He placed the known causes under two general headings, natural and human. However, considering proximate rather than ultimate causes a further classification might be, and indeed often is, made with regard to the conditions under which the fluctuations are produced by a given agency, natural or human. Thus we speak of ”water‐table conditions“ and ”artesian conditions,“ realizing, however, that the distinction between the two is not always definite. The phenomena peculiar to artesian conditions are usually the result merely of the imperviousness of the confining beds relative to the particular aquifer under consideration. Indeed, it is recognized that perhaps even the most dense clay is not absolutely impervious to the flow of water, given a difference in head, sufficient to produce the flow, though it may be beyond the precision of the means now employed to detect the flow of water through such impervious strata.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Fluctuations in artesian pressure produced by passing railroad‐trains as shown in a well on Long Island, New York
Series title Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union
DOI 10.1029/TR020i004p00666
Volume 20
Issue 4
Year Published 1939
Language English
Publisher American Geophysical Union
Description 9 p.
First page 666
Last page 674
Country United States
State New York
Other Geospatial Long Island
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