Analysis of genomic sequence data reveals the origin and evolutionary separation of Hawaiian hoary bat populations

Genome Biology and Evolution
By: , and 

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Abstract

We examine the genetic history and population status of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus semotus), the most isolated bats on Earth, and their relationship to northern hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), through whole-genome analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms mapped to a de novo-assembled reference genome. Profiles of genomic diversity and divergence indicate that Hawaiian hoary bats are distinct from northern hoary bats, and form a monophyletic group, indicating a single ancestral colonization event 1.34 Ma, followed by substantial divergence between islands beginning 0.51 Ma. Phylogenetic analysis indicates Maui is central to the radiation across the archipelago, with the southward expansion to Hawai‘i and westward to O‘ahu and Kaua‘i. Because this endangered species is of conservation concern, a clearer understanding of the population genetic structure of this bat in the Hawaiian Islands is of timely importance.

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Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Analysis of genomic sequence data reveals the origin and evolutionary separation of Hawaiian hoary bat populations
Series title Genome Biology and Evolution
DOI 10.1093/gbe/evaa137
Volume 12
Issue 9
Year Published 2020
Language English
Publisher Oxford Academic
Contributing office(s) Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center
Description 11 p.
First page 1504
Last page 1514
Country United States
State Hawaii
Other Geospatial Hawai'i, Kaua'i, Maui, O'ahu
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