Timing of ice retreat alters seabird abundances and distributions in the southeast Bering Sea

Biology Letters
By: , and 

Links

Abstract

Timing of spring sea-ice retreat shapes the southeast Bering Sea food web. We compared summer seabird densities and average bathymetry depth distributions between years with early (typically warm) and late (typically cold) ice retreat. Averaged over all seabird species, densities in early-ice-retreat-years were 10.1% (95% CI: 1.1–47.9%) of that in late-ice-retreat-years. In early-ice-retreat-years, surface-foraging species had increased numbers over the middle shelf (50–150 m) and reduced numbers over the shelf slope (200–500 m). Pursuit-diving seabirds showed a less clear trend. Euphausiids and the copepod Calanus marshallae/glacialis were 2.4 and 18.1 times less abundant in early-ice-retreat-years, respectively, whereas age-0 walleye pollock Gadus chalcogrammus near-surface densities were 51× higher in early-ice-retreat-years. Our results suggest a mechanistic understanding of how present and future changes in sea-ice-retreat timing may affect top predators like seabirds in the southeastern Bering Sea.

Study Area

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Timing of ice retreat alters seabird abundances and distributions in the southeast Bering Sea
Series title Biology Letters
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0276
Volume 12
Issue 9
Year Published 2016
Language English
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center Biology MFEB
Description 20160276, 7 p.
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial southeastern Bering Sea
Google Analytics Metrics Metrics page
Additional publication details