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A system for monitoring impact of Denali National Park road traffic on wildlife

Biological Science Report 1997-0001

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Abstract

The Denali National Park and Preserve (DENA) is a 6.03 million acre reserve lying between Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska.  The park was established in 1917 as a wildlife refuge, and is managed to maintain the wilderness character.  With the highest mountain in North America, Mt. McKinley, and the easy availability of wildlife for viewing, the park is Alaska's most favored destination point.  From 1972 through 1984, visitation grew from 88, 615 to 394, 426 visitor days per year (GMP, 1986), and then increased by 50,000 per year to 596,000 visitors in 1988.  This demand for motorized access to the park, especially along the 92.5 mile-long park road, has resulted in controversy and claims of traffic disturbance to wildlife [(letter from Superintendent, DENA July 13, 1988) (Anchorage Daily News, May 14, 1995; May 26, 1995; February 5, 1996; June 18, 1996) Leo (1987); Lee Rue (1996)].

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Title:
A system for monitoring impact of Denali National Park road traffic on wildlife
Series title:
Biological Science Report
Series number:
1997-0001
Year Published:
1997
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Description:
259 p.