Great Lakes restoration success through science: U.S. Geological Survey accomplishments 2010 through 2013

Circular 1404
A Product of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
By:

Links

Abstract

The Great Lakes (Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario) are the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth and serve as an important source of drinking water, transportation, power, and recreational opportunities for the United States and Canada. They also support an abundant commercial and recreational fishery, are crucial for agriculture, and are essential to the economic vitality of the region. The Great Lakes support a wealth of biological diversity, including over 200 globally rare plants and animals and more than 40 species that are found nowhere else in the world. However, more than a century of environmental degradation has taken a substantial toll on the Great Lakes. To stimulate and promote the goal of a healthy Great Lakes region, President Obama and Congress created the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) in 2009. The GLRI is an interagency collaboration that seeks to address the most significant environmental problems in the Great Lakes ecosystem. The GLRI is composed of five focus areas that address these issues:

  • Cleaning up toxic substances and Areas of Concern,
  • Preventing and controlling invasive species,
  • Promoting nearshore health,
  • Protecting and restoring habitat and wildlife,
  • Tracking progress and working with partners.

As of August 2013, the GLRI had funded more than 1,500 projects and programs of the highest priority to meet immediate cleanup, restoration, and protection needs. These projects use scientific analyses as the basis for identifying the restoration needs and priorities for the GLRI. Results from the science, monitoring, and other on-the-ground actions by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide the scientific information needed to help guide the Great Lakes restoration efforts. This document highlights a selection of USGS projects for each of the five focus areas through 2013, demonstrating the importance of science for restoration success. Additional information for these and other USGS projects that are important for Great Lakes restoration is available at http://cida.usgs.gov/glri/glri-catalog/.

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Great Lakes restoration success through science: U.S. Geological Survey accomplishments 2010 through 2013
Series title Circular
Series number 1404
DOI 10.3133/cir1404
Year Published 2014
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Contributing office(s) Michigan Water Science Center, Great Lakes Restoration
Description v, 56 p.
Time Range Start 2010-01-01
Time Range End 2013-12-31
Country Canada, United States
Other Geospatial Great Lakes
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N