Statistics of petroleum exploration in the non-Communist world outside the United States and Canada

Circular 981
By: , and 

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Abstract

The search for petroleum has expanded to include most countries in the world. From January 1, 1950, through 1980, about 160,000 crew months were spent in geologic and geophysical exploration in a study area that includes all nonCommunist countries outside the United States and Canada. By the end of 1982, almost 27,000 wildcat wells had been drilled in this study area; these and other pre-1983 wells delineated a prospective area of 1.56 million square miles in which about 836 billion barrels of ultimately recoverable crude oil has been found, 62 percent of it since 1950. The delineated prospective area is still expanding at a rate of 56,000 square miles per year (60 square miles per wildcat well) for the study area, and it is increasing in nearly every country in the study area. Maps of the delineated prospective area in each country show that in most countries, only a small part of the national territory has been explored. In spite of the expansion of the searched area, however, the rate of discovery has declined significantly from 22 million barrels per exploratory well in the 1950's to 8 million barrels per exploratory well in the 1970's.

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Statistics of petroleum exploration in the non-Communist world outside the United States and Canada
Series title Circular
Series number 981
DOI 10.3133/cir981
Year Published 1987
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s) Eastern Energy Resources Science Center
Description iv, 133 p.