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Quality of sediment discharging from the Barton Springs system, Austin, Texas, 2000-2002

Fact Sheet 089-03

In cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
By:

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Abstract

Four spring outlets of the Barton Springs system provide the only known habitat for the Barton Springs salamander (Eurycea sosorum), a federally listed endangered species. After heavy rainfall, sediment is flushed through the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and springflow often becomes turbid (cloudy). Sediment in urban areas often has high concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants, such as DDT, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and lead. In response to concerns that sediment discharging from the Barton Springs outlets could contain contaminants at levels that pose a threat to the health of the salamander or its prey, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, collected samples of suspended sediment discharging from each of the four spring outlets after two rainstorms and analyzed them for a suite of hydrophobic contaminants.

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Quality of sediment discharging from the Barton Springs system, Austin, Texas, 2000-2002
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
089-03
Year Published:
2003
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s):
Texas Water Science Center
Description:
HTML Document; Report: 6 p.
Country:
United States
State:
Texas
City:
Austin
Other Geospatial:
Barton Springs system