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Vulnerability of public drinking water supplies in New Jersey to pesticides

Fact Sheet 165-96

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Abstract

Beginning in 1993, Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) regulations required the 626 large community water systems in New Jersey to monitor their 2,600 wells and 45 surface-water intakes quarterly for 23 pesticides. Monitoring costs would increase consumers’ water bills by $6.4 million each year. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) can waive monitoring requirements for wells or intakes that are not vulnerable to pesticide contamination.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with NJDEP, determined the vulnerability of wells and surface-water intakes to pesticide contamination on the basis of hydrogeology and pesticide use. The NJDEP estimated that because many wells and intakes are not vulnerable to contamination by pesticides, monitoring waivers will save taxpayers at least $5.1 million annually for a one-time study cost of $1 million.

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Vulnerability of public drinking water supplies in New Jersey to pesticides
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
165-96
Year Published:
1996
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
2 p.
Country:
United States
State:
New Jersey
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N