thumbnail

Methods for monitoring the effects of grazing management on bank erosion and channel morphology, Fever River, Pioneer Farm, Wisconsin, 2004

Fact Sheet 2005-3134

By:
and

Links

Abstract

Bank erosion is a natural process that occurs in meandering streams (Leopold and others, 1964); however, in the Midwestern United States, historical and present agricultural activities in uplands, riparian areas, and channels have increased erosion (Waters, 1995; Lyons and others, 2000; Simon and Rinaldi, 2000; and Knox, 2001). Reducing streambank erosion is important because sediment carried by streams has adverse environmental effects; for example, sediment carried by streams is a major source of phosphorus (Waters, 1995). Continuous cattle grazing in riparian areas may increase local erosion processes in a meandering stream by removal or trampling of bank vegetation, which in turn affects channel morphology, water chemistry, and fish and aquatic-insect habitat (Kauffman and Krueger, 1984; Fitch and Adams, 1998). However, studies of livestock exclusion from riparian corridors have shown mixed results in reducing bank erosion (Trimble, 1994; Sarr, 2002). Some studies have shown reduced bank erosion after row-cropped or continuously grazed riparian areas are converted to managed grazing (see inset box) (Lyons and others, 2000; Sovell and others, 2000; and Zaimes and others, 2004).

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Methods for monitoring the effects of grazing management on bank erosion and channel morphology, Fever River, Pioneer Farm, Wisconsin, 2004
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
2005-3134
Year Published:
2005
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s):
Wisconsin Water Science Center
Description:
4 p.
Country:
United States
State:
Wisconsin
Other Geospatial:
Fever River, Pioneer Farm,
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N