Methods for monitoring the effects of grazing management on bank erosion and channel morphology, Fever River, Pioneer Farm, Wisconsin, 2004

Fact Sheet 2005-3134
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Abstract

Bank erosion is a natural process that occurs in meandering streams (Leopold and others, 1964); however, in the Midwestern United States, historical and present agricultural activities in uplands, riparian areas, and channels have increased erosion (Waters, 1995; Lyons and others, 2000; Simon and Rinaldi, 2000; and Knox, 2001). Reducing streambank erosion is important because sediment carried by streams has adverse environmental effects; for example, sediment carried by streams is a major source of phosphorus (Waters, 1995). Continuous cattle grazing in riparian areas may increase local erosion processes in a meandering stream by removal or trampling of bank vegetation, which in turn affects channel morphology, water chemistry, and fish and aquatic-insect habitat (Kauffman and Krueger, 1984; Fitch and Adams, 1998). However, studies of livestock exclusion from riparian corridors have shown mixed results in reducing bank erosion (Trimble, 1994; Sarr, 2002). Some studies have shown reduced bank erosion after row-cropped or continuously grazed riparian areas are converted to managed grazing (see inset box) (Lyons and others, 2000; Sovell and others, 2000; and Zaimes and others, 2004).

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Methods for monitoring the effects of grazing management on bank erosion and channel morphology, Fever River, Pioneer Farm, Wisconsin, 2004
Series title Fact Sheet
Series number 2005-3134
DOI 10.3133/fs20053134
Year Published 2005
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s) Wisconsin Water Science Center
Description 4 p.
Country United States
State Wisconsin
Other Geospatial Fever River, Pioneer Farm,
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N