Mapping traditional place names along the Koyukuk River: Koyukuk, Huslia, and Hughes, Western Interior Alaska

Fact Sheet 2014-3105
Eliza Jones - Koyukuk Elder; Susan Paskvan - Yukon- Koyukuk School District; Karin Bodony - Fish and Wildlife Service; Catherine Moncrieff - Yukon River Drainage Fisheries Association
By:  and 

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Abstract

Koyukon Athabascan peoples have settled along the Koyukuk River in Western Interior Alaska for thousands of years using the surrounding landscape for subsistence and cultural resources. However, recent changes in climate, technology, resource availability, and way of life have affected land-use patterns in the region, as well as use of the Denaakk'e (Koyukon) language. The current Koyukon population is about 2,300, and about 150 still speak the language (the youngest of whom are in their fifties). In addition, Elders, important keepers of both language and traditional subsistence-use areas, are aging, and opportunities to record their knowledge are diminishing.

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Mapping traditional place names along the Koyukuk River: Koyukuk, Huslia, and Hughes, Western Interior Alaska
Series title Fact Sheet
Series number 2014-3105
DOI 10.3133/fs20143105
Year Published 2014
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center Geography
Description 2 p.
Country United States
State Alaska
Online Only (Y/N) Y
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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