Peak Streamflow Determinations in Nevada: A Cooperative Program with the USGS and Nevada Department of Transportation

Fact Sheet 2021-3015
Prepared in cooperation with Nevada Department of Transportation
By:

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Background

Floods are one of the most costly and frequent natural disasters in Nevada. For example, the 1997 New Year’s flood has been estimated to have caused more than $1 billion in damage across northern Nevada (Truckee River Flood Management Authority, 2017). In 2014, more than 2 miles of Interstate 15 in southern Nevada was heavily damaged by the remnants of Hurricane Norbert combined with monsoonal rains (Sutko, 2015). Flooding in Nevada is highly variable in cause and the season of the year. Flooding can be caused by snowmelt, rain on snow, and flash flooding during thunderstorms. Peak streamflow estimates are critical for planning by government agencies; designation of flood zones; and design of infrastructure including culverts, bridges, and roadways. In order to provide accurate estimates of flood frequencies, long-term data collection of peak streamflows would be needed because the accuracy of estimates improves with longer datasets.

Suggested Citation

Schmidt, K., 2021, Peak streamflow determinations in Nevada: A cooperative program with the USGS and Nevada Department of Transportation: U.S. Geological Survey, Fact Sheet 2021-3015, 4 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20213015.

ISSN: 2327-6932 (online)

Study Area

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Peak streamflow determinations in Nevada: A cooperative program with the USGS and Nevada Department of Transportation
Series title Fact Sheet
Series number 2021-3015
DOI 10.3133/fs20213015
Year Published 2021
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Contributing office(s) Nevada Water Science Center
Description 4 p.
Country United States
State Nevada
Online Only (Y/N) Y
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