The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism

Professional Paper 1557
By: , and 

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Abstract

Mauna Kea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaii, is capped by lavas of alkalic and transitional basalt (Hamakua Volcanics) erupted between approximately 250-200 and 70-65 ka and hawaiite, mugearite, and benmoreite (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) erupted between approximately 65 and 4 ka. These lavas, which form the entire subaerial surface of the volcano, issued from numerous scattered vents and are intercalated on the upper slopes with glacial deposits. The lavas record diminishing magma-supply rate and degree of partial melting from the shield stage through the postshield stage. Much of the compositional variation apparently reflects fractionation of basaltic magma in reservoirs within and beneath the volcano.

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism
Series title Professional Paper
Series number 1557
DOI 10.3133/pp1557
Edition -
Year Published 1997
Language ENGLISH
Publisher U.S. G.P.O.,
Description 129 p.; 4 plates in pocket