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Effects of surface mining on fish and wildlife in Appalachia

Resource Publication 65

By:
and

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Abstract

This report on the effects of strip and surface mining on the fish and wildlife resources in eight Appalachian States is based in part on observation made during a tour of strip and surface mined area by the authors, as members of a team of specialist from six Federal agencies. Surface mining has caused extensive damage to fish and wildlife habitats and populations. A total of 832,605 acres of land have been disturbed; 81 percent of these are in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. More than 5,000 miles of Appalachian streams and 13,800 acres of impoundments have been seriously contaminated by acid mine water, some of it from surface mining. Additional water acreage has been adversely affected by tremendous quantities of silt and sediment. Reclamation of mined lands is needed. Three of the eight states visited in 1965-66 had no law requiring restoration of strip-mined lands, and other States needed stronger laws and more enforcement (Virginia and Tennessee have since passed laws governing strip mining). Reclamation as currently practiced in the Appalachian region does not adequately restore mined lands to minimal standards necessary to protect and improve fish and wildlife resources.

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Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Title:
Effects of surface mining on fish and wildlife in Appalachia
Series title:
Resource Publication
Series number:
65
Year Published:
1968
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Description:
iv, 20 p.
Country:
United States
State:
Alabama, Kenntucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennesee, Virginia, West Virginia
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N