Quantity and quality of urban runoff from three localities in the Denver Metropolitan area, Colorado

Water-Resources Investigations Report 79-64
By:  and 

Links

Abstract

Considerable variation in constituent concentrations was shown in urban runoff data for 1975-77 from three metropolitan Denver drainage basins. Constituent concentrations, greatest during initial rainfall runoff, generally peaked midday of snowmelt runoff, corresponding with maximum melting and runoff. Instantaneous loads of constituents were largely a function of discharge. Days since last street sweeping or antecedent precipitation had no apparent effect; snowmelt-runoff loads apparently increased with number of days snow had been on the ground. Urban storm runoff may significantly contribute total ammonia nitrogen, total nonfiltrable residue, total copper, total iron, total lead, and total zinc; and snowmelt runoff may significantly contribute sodium and chloride, to local receiving waters. Data from two basins were used for calibration and verification of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Storm Water Management Model II for rainfall-runoff modeling of flow and total nitrogen. The model assumption that land-surface loads of total nitrogen are directly proportional to number of days prior to storm during which accumulated rainfall was less than 1.0 inch was not substantiated. (Woodard-USGS)

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Quantity and quality of urban runoff from three localities in the Denver Metropolitan area, Colorado
Series title Water-Resources Investigations Report
Series number 79-64
DOI 10.3133/wri7964
Year Published 1979
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Description vi, 60 p.
Country United States
State Colorado
City Denver
Google Analytic Metrics Metrics page
Additional metadata about this publication, not found in other parts of the page is in this table